Five Easy Ways to Predict the Smoky Mountain Weather

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Ray of sunlight shining down on the Smoky Mountains at dawnEveryone wants to know what the weather will be like on their trip to the Smoky Mountains. At Visit My Smokies, we offer vacationers a consistent weather update. Although we don’t predict the Smoky Mountain weather months in advance, we decided to share a few weather predicting secrets with you.

1. Woolly Worms

Have you ever heard people mention using woolly worms to predict the weather? Although it may be an old wives’ tale, woolly worms are an easy way to predict harsh winter weather. It is believed: the more black on a woolly worm, the harsher the winter weather will be. If the woolly worm has a lot of brown, the winter weather should be lighter. Woolly worms have 13 segments which represent each week of the winter season.

2. Brighter Fall Foliage

Vacationers travel miles and miles to see the bright fall colors of the Smoky Mountains. It is said that the brighter the fall colors, the colder the winter months will be. Colors change as the chlorophyll decreases in the trees which happens when the weather cools down. Therefore, the colder the weather, the brighter the colors!

3. Unusual Squirrel Activity

Watching wildlife is a great way to predict the weather! If you’re in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, take a trip to Cades Cove and see what the animals are doing! In particular, if the squirrels are gathering a large amount of food and burying it, it’s a sign that colder weather is on the way. It is said that animals use their senses to determine the upcoming weather pattern.

4. Thicker Corn Husks

It’s corn maze season in the Smokies! When you visit a corn maze this fall, take a look at the corn stalks! Are the husks thick or thin? Corn relies on warmth to thrive. Folklore says: when thick corn husks tighten around the corn, the husks are protecting the corn from cooler Smoky Mountain weather.

5. Foggy August

Legend claims: for every foggy morning in August, there will be a snowfall in the winter. This hasn’t proven to be completely true, but many farmer’s almanacs still mention the idea.

Make sure to share this blog post on Facebook, so your friends can also predict the weather for their vacation! For all of your travel needs, take a look at Visit My Smokies’ website where you can find information about lodging, attractions and restaurants in the area.

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